Pay to play your old games on Vita

The long running joke in the video games world is that Nintendo are often re-selling the same game over and over again by way of re-packaging or re-distributing. I mean, how many times have you bought Super Mario Bros.? A new version of this is the HD remake which Sony have adopted as their go to solution for selling old content and that’s fine, most of the games are classics and should be experienced by new audiences. However Sony’s solution for current PSP owners to be able to play their UMD games on the UMD-less PSVita isn’t exactly ideal. Or all that fair.

According to Kotaku, Sony are to launch something called the UMD Passport service on the 6th December in Japan where the UMD Registration App will become available for PSPs. Once downloaded you fire up the handheld, insert a game disc and register it through your PSN account. After said stages, the game will be available to download – for a price. Yep, in order to play your old games on a PSVita, you’ll have to pay anywhere between 80p (¥100) and £19 (¥2400) depending on the title. The former is much more palatable than the latter. At the moment, 40 publishers have signed up to the program offering 200 games with the average price looking to hover at £8 (¥1000). Games like Gran Turismo and DiRT 2 for example.

It should be known that the prices mentioned are discounted and those 200 games will cost more to download for people who don’t already own the UMD but it does make me question why there is any cost at all. If the price was one set fee I could understand that. I could be told it was to cover admin and the cost of setting up this scheme in the first place but differing prices just looks like previous supporters of a product are getting screwed. Sony have also covered their butts when it comes to the prospect of piracy as once a UMD is registered with an account, it can’t be passed on and registered to another allowing more than one owner to receive the discount (via Andriasang).

But hey, on the plus side the scheme also works for the PSPgo meaning finally owners of that ill-fated downloadable-only hardware can play the games which never came to PSN in the first place.

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The PSVita may support older games and last longer than five hours

Back in June, a Japanese research company asked a collection of potential 3DS owners why they weren’t buying the handheld. The number one reason was its cost and now that’s been cut so dramatically, presumably some of those questioned are now owners of Nintendo’s new handheld. That is unless it was the weak battery life which put them off. It was number nine on the list and the actual gameplay time Nintendo say is capable on the 3DS is between three and eight hours.

Not quite the seemingly endless amount previous DS systems could run for but it may just end up being longer than what the PSVita can do. As part of the 2011 Tokyo Game Show, Sony has announced that its new portable machine will last somewhere between three and five hours depending on what you’re doing on it. If you’re offline, have the screen brightness at default, refrain from using Bluetooth and the built-in speakers opting for headphones instead, consumers should expect three to five hour gaming sessions. If you fancy oggling a film or two on the rather nice OLED display, the PSVita tops around five hours and for music alone it’s more like nine hours.

Though not quite the numbers wanted, there’s only so much a humble rechargeable battery can do and the PSVita is certainly a powerful beast. It’s a shame that from what Sony are saying, playing games with a brightened screen and online will lesson the battery life even more but when the PSVita is being touted as a portable PS3, it’s annoying but somewhat understandable.

Much like Sony’s other TGS announcement. It’s been promised that the PSVita will support older PSP titles and those downloaded from PSN will be retrofitted to use the second analog stick. But what of the numerous disc-based UMD games? Some of them never made it to PSN, will PSVita owners be able to get their hands on them too? Sony’s answer: maybe (via Kotaku). As of now, they’re thinking of solutions for gamers with solely UMD collections who want to upgrade to the PSVita but have said little else on the matter. To me, it sounds an awful lot like the promises made around the early days of the PSPgo. Back then we were led to believe a programme would be put in place for a UMD conversion programme however due to legal and technical issues, Sony abandoned the idea. But, as neat as the PSPgo was, it was never at the forefront of Sony’s long term strategies whereas the PSVita is. It’s their next portable, the PSP2 in fact and they want it to be big. So migrating the old audience from PSP to Vita is essential and if it means coming up with some crazy scheme then a crazy scheme we can certainly expect.

God of War: Ghost of Sparta goes cheap on PSN

Sony’s Playstation Store receives a hefty discount on God of War: Ghost of Sparta, the latest PSP game in the highly regarded franchise. High street stores have an RRP of £24.99 for the game whereas the price drops to £16.99 for PSN.

The offer is a tiny win for owners of the PSPgo which can only play games downloaded from the store as the prices are usually a lot higher than their physical UMD-based counterparts. Whether or not the trend will follow on for all new PSP titles is a possibility but nothing has been confirmed from Sony. If they wish to resuscitate the gasping PSPgo from total failure then they’d be wise to do so. Recently, the price of a system dropped £65 to only £160 but is still struggling to in the retail market. And with constant rumours of a PSP2 on the horizon, the PSPgo needs all the help it can get.

{Thanks MCV}

PSPgone

Thanks http://www.displayblog.com for the image

Yesterday brought news of 3 free digital versions of games for PSP owners wishing to buy a PSPgo. An interesting incentive but many were holding out for the promised scheme to transfer their existing UMD games to the memory-only PSPgo. Now however, Kotaku has been in contact with a SCEA (Sony of America) who had the unfortunate job of delivering this statement: “We were evaluating a UMD conversion programme, but due to legal and technical reasons we will not be offering the programme at this time.” Technical? Could we not post off our UMDs and be sent digital versions instead? Or maybe Sony stores have a ‘drop in’ centre? The questionable legality of it all puzzles me also but not being a man of law I guess it would! It’s odd to think that if we relinquish our old UMDs for a digital version that would cause any legal issues. There is still hope that being in Europe, we may have differing laws relating to such a transition. Fingers are being crossed but I’m betting those fingers will be disappointed.